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Chesterton House

A Center for Christian Studies at Cornell

About Cornell

Cornell University is one of the most prestigious institutions of higher education in the world. Founded in 1865, Cornell is a member of the Ivy League, and the land grant institution for New York State. It consists of thirteen colleges, including both privately endowed and state-assisted colleges. Professional schools include management, law, medicine, and veterinary medicine. Cornell awarded the first baccalaureate or doctoral degrees in several fields, including hotel administration, labor relations, veterinary medicine, electrical engineering, and industrial engineering. The university is also home to seven national research centers. Students come to Cornell from all over the world and go out to be leaders in every sphere of society. The student body consists of 13,000 undergraduate and 6,000 graduate students from all fifty states and more than a hundred countries. Cornell produces more graduates that go on to become doctors than any other university. It also produces the largest number of graduates in the life sciences who continue for Ph.D. degrees, and the third highest number in science and engineering. Cornell students and faculty members have garnered 21 Nobel prizes. Just a few of Cornell's many notable graduates include Sandy Berger, Ken Blanchard, Harold Bloom, Joyce Brothers, Pearl Buck, Allen Funt, Frank Gannett, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Austin Kiplinger, C. Everett Koop, Teng-hui Lee, Toni Morrison, John Mott, Edmund Muskie, Tom Peters, Thomas Pynchon, Christopher Reeve, Janet Reno, E.B. White, and Peter Yarrow. For more information, see the Cornell University website.