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Chesterton House

A Center for Christian Studies at Cornell

Events at Chesterton House

Upcoming Events

Faith & Engineering

Friday Conversation with James Noronha ‘09

Friday, Oct 13, 2017

5:00 pm

Discussion Group, Public Lecture

James Noronha (B.S. Engineering '09) was a member of Fellowship of
Christian Athletes and Naval ROTC at Cornell. He went into the Marines
after graduation, deploying to the Pacific and the Afghan War. After
leaving the military he spent a year in Jordan dedicated to missions and
learning Arabic language and culture. He helped start a gym there as part
of a team using the camaraderie of athletics to build connections to share
the gospel. James currently works at Turbocam, an international engineering
company dedicated to honoring God through their work and supporting
Christian service around the world. He manages a division, leads intern
development, and is exploring new locations to start manufacturing. He
volunteers at Athletes Intervarsity at the University of New Hampshire,
where he enjoys sharing his excitement in what God calls us to, and
equipping students to use their skills in athletics and business in God's
kingdom.

"Alleged" Film Screening & Discussion

Join the film's screenwriter - Fred Foote '82 for this event

Sunday, Oct 15, 2017

2:00 pm

Movie Night, Public Lecture

Fred is a cum laude graduate of Cornell University (1982) and a graduate of Harvard Law School (1987). Since 1989 Fred has been involved with the First National Bank of America and its holding company (collectively, “First National”). He has been involved in First National’s purchase of tax liens, seller-carryback notes, loan portfolios, and the origination of both conforming and non-conforming residential loans. In 2002 Fred was recognized as one of the country’s 10 leaders in the private mortgage (seller-carryback) industry.

Fred is also the principal screenwriter of a feature film set against the backdrop of the so-called Scopes Monkey Trial (1925) entitled Alleged. This movie is a romantic drama that focuses on a young reporter in Dayton who finds himself increasingly caught in a web of lies involving the trial, his home town, the media (especially H.L. Mencken), and Darwinist eugenics.

Life in Christ, Life in the Lab

Dr. Marisa Cristina March

Tuesday, Oct 17, 2017

7:00 pm

Public Lecture

Dr. Marisa Cristina March is a cosmologist who specializes in dark energy science research, a field that seeks to understand the acceleration of the Universe.  Dr. March is a member of the ground based Dark Energy Survey where she works on supernova cosmology and observes at CTIO’s Blanco Telescope.  Dr. March has worked on galaxy lensing for European Space Agency’s future Euclid space mission, she was a Post Doctoral Research Assistant at Penn’s David Rittenhouse Laboratory and prior to that a Research Fellow at the University of Sussex. Dr. March studied theoretical physics at Imperial College London, where she also carried out her doctoral research on advanced statistical methods for astrophysical probes of cosmology; she also holds a Bachelors degree in Catholic Theology from Heythrop College London.

This lecture is a St. Albert The Great Forum hosted by the Cornell Catholic Community.

Wendell Berry's Ecological Vision

Dr. Michael Stevens, author of "Wendell Berry and the Cultivation of Life"

Thursday, Oct 19, 2017

7:00 pm

Partner Event, Public Lecture

Dr. Michael Stevens believes Wendell Berry is a crucial voice for the world today, and more particularly, for Christians. His book, written with co-author Dr. Matthwe Bonzo, "Wendell Berry and the Cultivation of Life" evaluates Wendell Berry’s writings theologically, addressing themes congruent with contemporary theological concerns while acknowledging ways Berry’s vision can be adopted and lived. It’s no secret that Bonzo and Stevens find Berry to be a profound writer who provides the church with a new vision of life. While Berry’s writing is unlike traditional theological writing, the authors affirm Hauerwas’ statement at the end of the Gifford Lectures in “The Necessity of Witness” when he “offers John Paul II, John Howard Yoder, and Wendell Berry as crucial voices exhorting the church to a properly countercultural vision of life.” Though Berry seems like a “surprising inclusion” in this list, Bonzo and Stevens argue it is because Berry “represents the fullest embodiment of telling ‘the Story’ through stories…Berry’s work is precisely the sort of ‘renarration’ that can bring healing and make visible the call to ‘practice resurrection’” (35).

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Au Sable Fellows & Graduate Christian Fellowship.


Michael Stevens (Ph.D. in Literature, Institute of Philosophic Studies, University of Dallas) is an English professor at Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he has taught since 1997.  His original graduate work on T.S. Eliot's socio-political ideas led him on a circuitous route to the fiction, poetry, and essays of the Kentucky farmer Wendell Berry, about whom he and colleague Matt Bonzo wrote Wendell Berry and the Cultivation of Life for Brazos Press in 2008.  He has also published articles and chapters on Berry's critique of higher education, his pacifism, and his fictional universe.  A native of Harford, in rural Cortland County, New York, Stevens attended high school in Dryden and often visited his grandparents on Ellis Hollow Road in Ithaca.  After college, he even worked a brief but eventful stint at Cornell University Catering!  He and his wife Linda (a native of Long Island) have raised their three kids in Michigan, amidst maple trees and apple orchards that betoken the strong link to New York State of Michigan's early settlers (yes, there is an Ithaca, Michigan, and a Dryden, etc.).  Ethan (20), Julia (17), and Gabe (15) are still waiting for Dad to take them to the Moosewood Restaurant on one of these Grandma visits.

 

 

 

At Home in Creation: Wendell Berry's Vision for Life

Friday Conversation with Dr. Michael Stevens

Friday, Oct 20, 2017

5:00 pm

Discussion Group, Public Lecture

Dr. Michael Stevens believes Wendell Berry is a crucial voice for the world today, and more particularly, for Christians. His book, written with co-author Dr. Matthwe Bonzo, "Wendell Berry and the Cultivation of Life" evaluates Wendell Berry’s writings theologically, addressing themes congruent with contemporary theological concerns while acknowledging ways Berry’s vision can be adopted and lived. It’s no secret that Bonzo and Stevens find Berry to be a profound writer who provides the church with a new vision of life. While Berry’s writing is unlike traditional theological writing, the authors affirm Hauerwas’ statement at the end of the Gifford Lectures in “The Necessity of Witness” when he “offers John Paul II, John Howard Yoder, and Wendell Berry as crucial voices exhorting the church to a properly countercultural vision of life.” Though Berry seems like a “surprising inclusion” in this list, Bonzo and Stevens argue it is because Berry “represents the fullest embodiment of telling ‘the Story’ through stories…Berry’s work is precisely the sort of ‘renarration’ that can bring healing and make visible the call to ‘practice resurrection’” (35).

Michael Stevens (Ph.D. in Literature, Institute of Philosophic Studies, University of Dallas) is an English professor at Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he has taught since 1997.  His original graduate work on T.S. Eliot's socio-political ideas led him on a circuitous route to the fiction, poetry, and essays of the Kentucky farmer Wendell Berry, about whom he and colleague Matt Bonzo wrote Wendell Berry and the Cultivation of Life for Brazos Press in 2008.  He has also published articles and chapters on Berry's critique of higher education, his pacifism, and his fictional universe.  A native of Harford, in rural Cortland County, New York, Stevens attended high school in Dryden and often visited his grandparents on Ellis Hollow Road in Ithaca.  After college, he even worked a brief but eventful stint at Cornell University Catering!  He and his wife Linda (a native of Long Island) have raised their three kids in Michigan, amidst maple trees and apple orchards that betoken the strong link to New York State of Michigan's early settlers (yes, there is an Ithaca, Michigan, and a Dryden, etc.).  Ethan (20), Julia (17), and Gabe (15) are still waiting for Dad to take them to the Moosewood Restaurant on one of these Grandma visits.

 

Homecoming Open House and BBQ

Come and join us!

Saturday, Oct 21, 2017

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

Public Lecture

All welcome for fun, food & fellowship.

Healing Our Divided Nation with David Brooks, Propaganda & Kara Powell

Q Union Video Conference

Friday, Oct 27, 2017

7:00 pm

Public Lecture

Chesterton House is hosting a viewing of the Q Union conference of "Healing Our Divided Nation." Q Union brings the Q experience to universities around the nation by teaming up with campus leaders for a unique evening that combines nationally broadcasted talks with curated live presentations from our students.

David Brooks is an op-ed columnist for The New York Times and appears regularly on “PBS NewsHour,” NPR’s “All Things Considered” and NBC’s “Meet the Press.” He teaches at Yale University and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the bestselling author of The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement; Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There; and On Paradise Drive: How We Live Now (And Always Have) in the Future Tense. He has three children and lives in Maryland.

Jason Petty, also known as Propaganda, is a Los Angeles-based hip-hop and spoken word artist who aims to communicate in any creative form possible. He’s an intellectual, a poet, political activist, academic & emcee with degrees in illustration & intercultural studies in addition to songs that have landed on Billboard's Top Christian, Top Gospel, and Rap music charts. Growing up black in a mexican neighborhood and later a suburban all-white neighborhood, he is armed with a bold message of alliance and has assembled a body of work that both challenges & reaches across the spectrum of pop culture. Propaganda is an advocate for the value of human life and seeks to empower people through art and social justice.

Kara Powell, PhD, is the Executive Director of the Fuller Youth Institute and a faculty member at Fuller Theological Seminary. She is an author of numerous books including Growing Young and Right Click: Parenting Your Teenager in a Digital Media World. Coinciding with her extensive research, focus groups, interviews and observations on the effects technology has on this generation, Kara has also done extensive work and analysis of how technology affects human relationships.

 

Winter Course for Credit

"The Heart of the Old Testament" with Dr. Elaine Philips, Gordon College

Sunday, Jan 14, 2018

4:00 pm

Class

"The Heart of the Old Testament: Nurturing Love for God and God’s People" (2 credits)

The foundational goal of all education must be character formation. There is no better resource than the Old Testament with its timeless narratives of God’s perfect faithfulness in the face of human frailty, and the repeated exhortations to embody uprightness as we love our neighbors as ourselves. The moral and ethical issues that we confront in the 21st century are refractions of the same dilemmas God’s people have faced for millennia.

Earn 2 credits in 1 week! More details for registration coming soon.

 

 About Dr. Elaine Philips (A Cornell Alumna!)

After receiving her undergraduate degree in social psychology from Cornell University and the Master of Divinity degree from Biblical Theological Seminary, Elaine Phillips, along with her husband, Perry, studied and taught for three years in Israel. Upon their return, they taught at a small Christian junior college outside of Philadelphia from 1979-1992 and Elaine earned her Ph.D. in rabbinic literature from The Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning in Philadelphia. She has taught biblical studies at Gordon College since 1993. She and Perry have continued to take Gordon students back to Jerusalem University College, where they serve as adjunct faculty for the three-week summer study program in historical geography. In addition to field study in Israel, her areas of interest and scholarly writing include the books of Exodus and Esther, biblical wisdom literature, and rabbinic texts. Her book-length commentary on Esther is included in The Expositor's Bible Commentary, edited by Tremper Longman III and David Garland. In 2014, her devotional, With God, Nothing is Impossible, was published by Deep River Books. She has received both the Junior and Senior Distinguished Faculty Awards and at the commencement ceremonies in May 2014 was granted the inaugural Distinguished Professor award. She also enjoys music, hiking and all things related to summers in northwestern Ontario.